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Steve Jobs’ Mind Power Secrets

October 21, 2011 2 comments

Source: Finer Minds

For the past week, we’ve been reading about the many awesome breakthroughs which Steve Jobs envisioned and created for the world. And as we allowed our minds to explore further, we couldn’t help but connect the dots that perhaps Steve practiced the art of Creative Visualization?

“The world has lost a great visionary” mourns the headlines of the world news the day Steve Jobs passed away. Now you would be wondering how Steve Jobs connects with creative visualization. Well there is a deep inherent bond between every great man and the power of his mind.

This power is shared by entire human consciousness but most of us don’t get a chance to realize this great potential. Last night I just happened to stumble upon Steve Jobs’ Harvard convocation speech and I decided to share it here. As I feel that it could prove to be a great inspiration to all of you. Let’s see how it connects with your spree to explore mind power.

Listen to the voice

Steve Jobs’ Harvard speech presents a very important point which is crucial to the quest of discovering soul and its powers.  He says that we spend our life listening to the voices coming from outside and in its humdrum and noise we lose contact with our own inner voice. So if you want to find true ingenuity and genius, you have to block these voices and concentrate on the voice coming from with in. and this is what creative visualization is all about.

Naturally this spiritual streak is inspired of Buddhism. You can concentrate on this inner voice by few simple exercises. You can start by retreating to a quiet place and talking to yourself. Soon you will start getting answer from the inner voice. Conversation is a way of nourishing your soul’s voice. Talk to yourself and see the voice growing and gaining strength. This voice will lead you towards the path you are destined for. This exercise will help you in exploring and identifying your ingenuity and genius. You have to believe that you are destined for a special task but you have to strive towards it. Filtering the unnecessary voices and reaching towards “your” voice is the real mission.

Join the dots

Steve says that every event of life is connected and you have to see things in totality in order to get to the real meaning of the events. When we see success, defeat, happiness, loss and all these conflicting events, they appear more like polarities rather than meaningful and complimenting powers. The real meaning appears when we learn to join the dots and perceive thing in whole.He quotes the example of a calligraphy course which he took and it helped him in learning to join the dots in life. Life takes a total new shape when we perceive things in this way. Creative visualization can help you in developing this vision.

Acceptance

Steve says he learned more about life when he faced death. When he came to know about his state of health, he enjoyed life even more. So live every day of your life to its fullest as it’s the unpredictability and uncertainty of life which makes it more worth willing.

 

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Categories: Famous People Stories

Steve Jobs Death: Comments & Condolence Messages From The Masters

October 8, 2011 2 comments

The founder and CEO of Apple Steve Jobs has died from pancreatic cancer on October 5th, 2011 at the age of 56. This message appeared on the official website of the company.

The company’s website stated that today the world lost a genius and a remarkable, extraordinary person, and those lucky enough to personally know and work with Steve lost a friend and mentor. Steve Jobs created the company, which could only be done by a man of his scale. His spirit will always be a guide for the company’s actions.

Condolences to the family and friends of Steve Jobs have been sent by many politicians and public figures worldwide, read some of them below:

“Cheers to your greatness, Steve Jobs. You will forever be missed.” – Jack Canfield, American Motivational Speaker & Author.

“He was one of the greatest icons of the modern era and his untimely death was a huge loss to all.” – Ratan Tata, chairman of Tata Group.

“Steve, thank you for being a mentor and a friend. Thanks for showing that what you build can change the world. I will miss you.” – Mark Zuckerburg, The Facebook Founder.

“I’m truly saddened to learn of Steve Jobs’ death. Melinda and I extend our sincere condolences to his family and friends, and to everyone Steve has touched through his work. Steve and I first met nearly 30 years ago, and have been colleagues, competitors and friends over the course of more than half our lives. The world rarely sees someone who has had the profound impact Steve has had, the effects of which will be felt for many generations to come. For those of us lucky enough to get to work with him, it’s been an insanely great honor. I will miss Steve immensely.” – ~ Bill Gates, Microsoft Chairman.

“Michelle and I are saddened to learn of the passing of Steve Jobs. Steve was among the greatest of American innovators – brave enough to think differently, bold enough to believe he could change the world, and talented enough to do it.

By building one of the planet’s most successful companies from his garage, he exemplified the spirit of American ingenuity. By making computers personal and putting the internet in our pockets, he made the information revolution not only accessible, but intuitive and fun. And by turning his talents to storytelling, he has brought joy to millions of children and grownups alike. Steve was fond of saying that he lived every day like it was his last. Because he did, he transformed our lives, redefined entire industries, and achieved one of the rarest feats in human history: he changed the way each of us sees the world.

The world has lost a visionary. And there may be no greater tribute to Steve’s success than the fact that much of the world learned of his passing on a device he invented. Michelle and I send our thoughts and prayers to Steve’s wife Laurene, his family, and all those who loved him” – President Barack Obama – USA.

“I am very, very sad to hear the news about Steve. He was a great man with incredible achievements and amazing brilliance. He always seemed to be able to say in very few words what you actually should have been thinking before you thought it. His focus on the user experience above all else has always been an inspiration to me. He was very kind to reach out to me as I became CEO of Google and spend time offering his advice and knowledge even though he was not at all well. My thoughts and Google’s are with his family and the whole Apple family.” – Larry Page, Google CEO.

“Steve Jobs was a great friend as well as a trusted advisor. His legacy will extend far beyond the products he created or the businesses he built. It will be the millions of people he inspired, the lives he changed and the culture he defined. Steve was such an ‘original,’ with a thoroughly creative, imaginative mind that defined an era. Despite all he accomplished, it feels like he was just getting started. With his passing the world has lost a rare original, Disney has lost a member of our family, and I have lost a great friend.” – Bob Iger, Disney CEO.

“Today the world lost a visionary leader, the technology industry lost an iconic legend and I lost a friend and fellow founder. The legacy of Steve Jobs will be remembered for generations to come.” – Michael Dell, Dell CEO.

“Once in a rare while, somebody comes along who doesnt just raise the bar, they create an entirely new standard of measurement.” – Dick Costolo ,Twitter CEO.

“People like Steve Jobs change our world. My sincere condolences to his loved ones and to everyone who admired his intellect and talent.”- Dmitri Medvedev, Russian President

And this below message goes on behalf of all Africans, who are truly grateful for all the contribution given by Steve Jobs to Africa.

“You were a great mentor and source of  inspiration to us, thank you for everything. Rest in peace Steve Jobs. Our prayers and thought are with Family and friends of Apple Founder. Aum Namah Shivay” – Love-The Life Force Energy.

Categories: Famous People Stories

Notes From a Friend

May 3, 2011 2 comments

On Thanksgiving many years ago, a young family awoke with a sense of foreboding. Instead of looking forward to a day filled with gratitude, they were preoccupied by thoughts of what they did not have. At best, they would scrape together a meager meal on this day of ‘feasting’. If they had contacted a local charity group, they would have had a turkey with all the trimmings, but they hadn’t. Why? Because they are like many other families, were proud people.

Somehow they would make do with what they had. They difficult situation led to frustration and hopelessness, then to irreparable, harsh words between the mother and father. The eldest son felt devastated and helpless as he watched the people he loved most become more and more angry and depressed. Then destiny intervened… a loud and unexpected knock at the door! The boy opened it and was greeted by a tall man in rumpled clothing. He was grinning broadly, caring a huge basket brimming with every conceivable Thanksgiving delight: a turkey, stuffing, pies, sweet potatoes, and canned goods – everything for a holiday feast!

The family was stunned. The man at the door said, “This is from someone who knows you’re in need and wants you to know that you are loved and cared for.” At first, the father of the family didn’t want to take the basket, but the man said, “Look, I’m just a delivery person.” Smiling, he sat the basket in the boy’s arms, turned to leave, and then called over his shoulder, “Have a great Thanksgiving!” In that moment, this young man’s life was forever changed. With this simple act of kindness he learned that hope is eternal, that people – even “strangers” – really do care. The sense of gratitude he felt moved him deeply, and he swore to himself that someday he’d do well enough to give something back to other in a similar way.

And by the time he was 18 years old, he had begun to fulfill that promise. With his scant earnings, he set out to purchase groceries, not for himself, but for two families he had learned were in dire need of food.  He then drove to deliver them, dressed in an old pair of jeans and a T-shirt, intending to present the gift as if he were a delivery boy. When he arrived at the first dilapidated house, he was greeted by a Latina woman who looked at him suspiciously. She had six children, and her husband had abandoned the family only a few days before. They had no food.

The young man offered, “I have a delivery for you ma’am.” He then went out to his car and begun to carry in bags and boxes overflowing with food: a turkey, stuffing, pies, sweet potatoes, canned goods. The woman’s jaw dropped. The children, when they saw the food brought into the house, let out shrieks of delight.

The young mother, who spoke only broken English, grabbed the young man by the arm and started to kiss him all over, saying, “You gift from God! You gift from God!”

“No, no,” the young man said. “I’m just the delivery boy. This is a gift from a friend.” Then he handed her a note that said, this is a note from a friend. Please have a wonderful Thanksgiving – you and your family deserve it. Know that you are loved. And someday if you have the chance, please do well enough to do this for someone else and pass on the gift.

The young man continued to bring in bag after bag of groceries. The excitement, joy, and love reached a fever pitch. By the time he left, the sense of connection and contribution moved the young man to tears. As he drove away, looking back at the smiling faces of the family he’d had the privilege to help, he realized that his story had come full circle, that to “horrible day” from his youth was actually a gift from God, guiding him, pointing him toward fulfillment through a life committed to contribution. With this one act, he begun a quest that continues to this day: to return the gift that was given to him and his family and to remind people that always a way to turn things around, that they are loved, and that – with simple steps, a little understanding, and massive action – whatever challenges exist now can be turned into valuable lessons and opportunities for personal growth and long term happiness.

How do I know so much about this young man and his family, not only about what they did, but also how they felt? Because He is me.

Anthony Robbins – From best selling book “Notes from a friend”

Categories: Famous People Stories

Adam Khoo – Power Of Money

March 15, 2011 Leave a comment

By: R. Hundoo.

Power of Money, By Adam Khoo (Singapore’s youngest millionaire at 26 yrs.)

Some of you may already know that I travel around the region pretty frequently, having to visit and conduct seminars at my offices in Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand and Suzhou (China). I am in the airport almost every other week so I get to bump into many people who have attended my seminars or have read my books.

Recently, someone came up to me on a plane to KL and looked rather shocked. He asked, ‘How come a millionaire like you is traveling economy?’ My reply was, ‘That’s why I am a millionaire.’ He still looked pretty confused.

This again confirms that greatest lie ever told about wealth (which I wrote about in my latest book ‘Secrets of Self-Made Millionaires’). Many people have been brainwashed to think that millionaires have to wear Gucci, Hugo Boss, Rolex, and sit on first class in air travel. This is why so many people never become rich because the moment they earn more money, they think that it is only natural that they spend more, putting them back to square one.

The truth is that most self-made millionaires are frugal and only spend on what is necessary and of value. That is why they are able to accumulate and multiply their wealth so much faster.

Over the last 7 years, I have saved about 80% of my income while today I save only about 60% (because I have my wife, mother in law, 2 maids, 2 kids, etc. to support). Still, it is way above most people who save 10% of their income (if they are lucky).

I refuse to buy a first class ticket or to buy a $300 shirt because I think that it is a complete waste of money. However, I happily pay $1,300 to send my 2-year old daughter to Julia Gabriel Speech and Drama without thinking twice.

When I joined the YEO (Young Entrepreneur’ s Organ) a few years back (YEO is an exclusive club open to those who are under 40 and make over $1m a year in their own business), I discovered that those who were self-made thought like me. Many of them with net worth well over $5 m, travelled economy class and some even drove Toyotas and Nissans, not Audis, Mercs, BMWs.

I noticed that it was only those who never had to work hard to build their own wealth (there were also a few ministers’ and tycoons’ sons in the club) who spent like there was no tomorrow. Somehow, when you did not have to build everything from scratch, you do not really value money. This is precisely the reason why a family’s wealth (no matter how much) rarely lasts past the third generation.

Thank God my rich dad foresaw this terrible possibility and refused to give me a cent to start my business.

Then some people ask me, ‘What is the point in making so much money if you don’t enjoy it?’ The thing is that I don’t really find happiness in buying branded clothes, jewellery or sitting first class. Even if buying something makes me happy it is only for a while, it does not last.

Material happiness never lasts; it just gives you a quick fix. After a while you feel lousy again and have to buy the next thing which you think will make you happy. I always think that if you need material things to make you happy, then you live a pretty sad and unfulfilled life.

Instead, what makes me happy is when I see my children laughing and playing and learning so fast. What makes me happy is when I see my companies and trainers reaching more and more people every year in so many more countries.

What makes me really happy is when I read all the emails about how my books and seminars have touched and inspired someone’s life.

What makes me really happy is reading all your wonderful posts about how this blog is inspiring you. This happiness makes me feel really good for a long time, much more than what a Rolex would do for me.

I think the point I want to put across is that happiness must come from doing your life’s work (be it teaching, building homes, designing, trading, winning tournaments etc.) and the money that comes is only a by-product. If you hate what you are doing and rely on the money you earn to make you happy by buying stuff, then I think that you are living a life of meaninglessness.

Categories: Famous People Stories

Neale Donald Walsh – A Messenger from God

February 26, 2011 2 comments

Neale Donald Walsch is a modern day spiritual messenger whose words continue to touch the world in profound ways. With an early interest in religion and a deeply felt connection to spirituality, Neale spent the majority of his life thriving professionally, yet searching for spiritual meaning before beginning his now famous conversation with God. His With God series of books has been translated into 27 languages, touching millions of lives and inspiring important changes in their day-to-day lives.

Neale began his journey in the most ordinary way. Overstressed and overextended by modern day life when the options ran out and frustration reached its peak, he turned to God. Desperate questions scratched on a legal pad in the middle of a long, sleepless night, began a precious dialogue which changed Neale’s life forever and eventually changed the lives of millions. This process began over 10 years ago and became the much loved Conversations with God Series.

Today the books have been translated into 37 languages, and Book One remains to this day in the 100 top selling spiritual books on Amazon.com.

Neale was born into a Roman Catholic family living in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. His first spiritual teacher was his mother, who taught him not to be afraid of God, as she believed in having a personal relationship with the Divine. She taught Neale to do the same. A non-traditional believer, Neale’s mother hardly ever went to church, and when he asked her why, she told Neale, “I don’t have to go to church-God comes to me. He’s with me and around me wherever I am.” This view of God in his childhood would open Neale fully as an adult to transcend the traditional views of organized religion and bring to the world the message found in Conversations with God.

An insatiably curious child, Neale’s comments about life seemed to possess a wisdom far beyond his years, and caused relatives and family friends to often ask, “where does he come up with this stuff?” While attending a Catholic grade school, Neale would often pose questions in Catechism class that would extend past the traditional grade school curriculum. Finally, the parish priest invited Neale to his rectory to answer questions. This meeting turned into a once-a-week visit that blossomed into an open forum where Neale learned not to be afraid to ask questions about religion and spirituality-and also learned that his asking these types of questions did not mean that he would offend God.
By the age of 15, Neale’s involvement with spiritually-based teachings led him to begin reading a variety of spiritual texts, including the Bible, the Rig Veda, the Upanishads and Divine revelation according to Sri Ramakrishna. He noticed that when people got involved in religion they seemed less joyful and angrier, exhibiting behaviors of prejudice and separateness. Neale concluded that the collective experience of theology was not positive.

After graduating from high school, he enrolled at the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee, but academic life could not hold his interest and he dropped out of college after two years to follow an interest in radio broadcasting that eventually led to a full-time position at the age of 19 at a small radio station far from his Milwaukee home, in Annapolis, Maryland.

Restless by nature and always seeking to expand his opportunities for self-expression, Neale in the years that followed became a radio station program director, a newspaper reporter and, ultimately, managing editor, public information officer for one of the nation’s largest public school systems, and, after moving to the West Coast, creator and owner of his own public relations and marketing firm. Moving from one career field to another, he could not seem to find occupational satisfaction, his relationship life was in constant turmoil and his health was going rapidly downhill.

He had relocated in Oregon as part of a change-of-scene strategy to find his way, but Fate was to provide more than a change of scene. It produced a change in his entire life. A car driven by an elderly gentleman made a left turn directly into his path, Neale emerging from the auto accident with a broken neck. He was lucky to escape with his life.

Over a year of rehab threw him out of work. A failed marriage had already removed him from his home, and soon he couldn’t keep even the small apartment he’d rented. Within months he found himself on the street, homeless. It took him the better part of a year to pull himself together and get back under shelter. He found, at first, modest part time jobs, once again in broadcasting, then worked his way into full time employment and an eventual spot as a syndicated radio talk show host.

He had seen the bottom of life, living in the weather, gathering beer and soda cans in the park to collect the return deposit-but now he seemed to be on a roll again. Yet, once more Neale felt an emptiness in his life. In 1992, following a period of deep despair, Neale awoke in the middle of a February night and wrote an anguished letter to God. “What does it take,” he angrily scratched across a yellow legal pad, “to make life work?”

Now well chronicled and widely talked about, it was this questioning letter that received a Divine answer. Neale says that he heard a voice, soft and kind, warm and loving, that gave him an answer to this and other questions. Awestruck and inspired, he quickly scribbled these responses onto the tablet.

More questions came, and, as fast as they occurred to him, answers were given in the same soft voice, which now seemed placed inside his head. Before he knew it, Neale found himself engaged in a two-way on-paper dialogue. He continued this first “conversation” for hours, and had many more in the weeks that followed, always awakening in the middle of the night and being drawn back to his legal pad. Neale’s handwritten notes would later become the best-selling Conversations with God books. He says the process was “exactly like taking dictation,” and that the dialogue created in this way was published without alteration or editing.

In July, 2005 Neale completed the final CwG dialogue book, HOME WITH God in a Life that Never Ends, to be released in March, 2006 by Atria Books, a division of Simon and Schuster. The book covers areas never before discussed in any of the previous CwG texts, of which there are nine, including Conversations with God-Book 1, Conversations with God-Book 2, Conversations with God-Book 3, Friendship with God, Communion with God, Conversations with God for Teens, the New Revelations, Tomorrow’s God, and What God Wants.

In 2001 Neale founded Humanity’s Team, which he has described as a worldwide civil rights movement for a soul (HumanitysTeam.com). In 2005 he began work on putting into place a global education program, The School of Theology of the New Spirituality (Schooofthenewspirituality.com). In early 2006 he created The Group of 1000, a community of supporters who seek to place Schools of the New Spirituality in cities, towns, and villages from around the world.

Categories: Famous People Stories

Three feet from Gold…

August 31, 2010 7 comments

This is a story from a chapter on persistence in “Think and Grow Rich,” perhaps the greatest success book ever written. The author was Napoleon Hill who was commissioned by the richest man in the world of the time, Andrew Carnegie to interview some of the most successful people of his time and find out the common secret of success. If you are serious about getting ahead, get the book.

“One of the most common causes of failure is the habit of quitting when one is overtaken by temporary defeat. Every person is guilty of this mistake at one time or another. An uncle of R. U. Darby was caught by the “gold fever” in the gold-rush days, and went west to DIG AND GROW RICH. He had never heard that more gold has been mined from the brains of men than has ever been taken from the earth. He staked a claim and went to work with pick and shovel. The going was hard, but his lust for gold was definite.

After weeks of labor, he was rewarded by the discovery of the shining ore. He needed machinery to bring the ore to the surface. Quietly, he covered up the mine, retraced his footsteps to his home in Williamsburg, Maryland, and told his relatives and a few neighbors of the “strike.” They got together money for the needed machinery, had it shipped. The uncle and Darby went back to work the mine.

The first car of ore was mined, and shipped to a smelter. The returns proved they had one of the richest mines in Colorado! A few more cars of that ore would clear the debts. Then it would come the big killing in profits.

Down went the drills! Up went the hopes of Darby and Uncle! Then something happened! The vein of gold ore disappeared! They had come to the end of the rainbow, and the pot of gold was no longer there! They drilled on, desperately trying to pick up the vein again-all to no avail.

Finally, they decided to QUIT. They sold the machinery to a junk man for a few hundred dollars, and took the train back home. Some “junk” men are dumb, but not this one! He called in a mining engineer to look at the mine and do a little calculating. The engineer advised that the project had failed, because the owners were not familiar with “fault lines.” His calculations showed that the vein would be found JUST THREE FEET FROM WHERE THE DARBYS HAD STOPPED DRILLING! That is exactly where it was found!

The “Junk” man took millions of dollars in ore from the mine, because he knew enough to seek expert counsel before giving up. Most of the money which went into the machinery was procured through the efforts of R. U. Darby, who was then a very young man. The money came from his relatives and neighbors, because of their faith in him. He paid back every dollar of it, although he was years in doing so.

Long afterward, Mr. Darby recouped his loss many times over, when he made the discovery that DESIRE can be transmuted into gold. The discovery came after he went into the business of selling life insurance.

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Remembering that he lost a huge fortune, because he STOPPED three feet from gold, Darby profited by the experience in his chosen work, by the simple method of saying to himself, “I stopped three feet from gold, but I will never stop because men say `no’ when I ask them to buy insurance.”

Darby is one of a small group of fewer than fifty men who sell more than a million dollars in life insurance annually. He owes his “stick ability” to the lesson he learned from his “quit ability” in the gold mining business.

Before success comes in any man’s life, he is sure to meet with much temporary defeat, and, perhaps, some failure. When defeat overtakes a man, the easiest and most logical thing to do is to QUIT. That is exactly what the majority of men do.

More than five hundred of the most successful men this country has ever known told the author their greatest success came just one step beyond the point at which defeat had overtaken them. Failure is a trickster with a keen sense of irony and cunning

Categories: Famous People Stories

Steve Jobs – The Apple Guy – Story III (Final)

August 30, 2010 2 comments

My third story is about death.

When I was 17, I read a quote that went something like: “If you live each day as if it was your last, someday you’ll most certainly be right.” It made an impression on me, and since then, for the past 33 years, I have looked in the mirror every morning and asked myself: “If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?” And whenever the answer has been “No” for too many days in a row, I know I need to change something.

Remembering that I’ll be dead soon is the most important tool I’ve ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life. Because almost everything — all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure – these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart.

About a year ago I was diagnosed with cancer. I had a scan at 7:30 in the morning, and it clearly showed a tumor on my pancreas. I didn’t even know what a pancreas was. The doctors told me this was almost certainly a type of cancer that is incurable, and that I should expect to live no longer than three to six months. My doctor advised me to go home and get my affairs in order, which is doctor’s code for prepare to die. It means to try to tell your kids everything you thought you’d have the next 10 years to tell them in just a few months. It means to make sure everything is buttoned up so that it will be as easy as possible for your family. It means to say your goodbyes.

I lived with that diagnosis all day. Later that evening I had a biopsy, where they stuck an endoscope down my throat, through my stomach and into my intestines, put a needle into my pancreas and got a few cells from the tumor. I was sedated, but my wife, who was there, told me that when they viewed the cells under a microscope the doctors started crying because it turned out to be a very rare form of pancreatic cancer that is curable with surgery. I had the surgery and I’m fine now.

This was the closest I’ve been to facing death, and I hope its the closest I get for a few more decades. Having lived through it, I can now say this to you with a bit more certainty than when death was a useful but purely intellectual concept:

No one wants to die. Even people who want to go to heaven don’t want to die to get there. And yet death is the destination we all share. No one has ever escaped it. And that is as it should be, because Death is very likely the single best invention of Life. It is Life’s change agent. It clears out the old to make way for the new. Right now the new is you, but someday not too long from now, you will gradually become the old and be cleared away. Sorry to be so dramatic, but it is quite true.

Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life. Don’t be trapped by dogma — which is living with the results of other people’s thinking. Don’t let the noise of others’ opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.

When I was young, there was an amazing publication called The Whole Earth Catalog, which was one of the bibles of my generation. It was created by a fellow named Stewart Brand not far from here in Menlo Park, and he brought it to life with his poetic touch. This was in the late 1960’s, before personal computers and desktop publishing, so it was all made with typewriters, scissors, and polaroid cameras. It was sort of like Google in paperback form, 35 years before Google came along: it was idealistic, and overflowing with neat tools and great notions.

Stewart and his team put out several issues of The Whole Earth Catalog, and then when it had run its course, they put out a final issue. It was the mid-1970s, and I was your age. On the back cover of their final issue was a photograph of an early morning country road, the kind you might find yourself hitchhiking on if you were so adventurous. Beneath it were the words: “Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.” It was their farewell message as they signed off. Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish. And I have always wished that for myself. And now, as you graduate to begin anew, I wish that for you.

“Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.”

Categories: Famous People Stories
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